Book Review: Immaculate Assumptions

From a reviewer with Online Books.

Yesterday, 23:42

[Following is an official OnlineBookClub.org review of “Immaculate Assumptions” by Cornelia Scott Cree.]

Book Cover


4 out of 4 stars


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Immaculate Assumptions: All the Stuff You Heard about the Bible that Isn’t True is an enlightening and liberating book written by Cornelia Scott Cree.

In this book, the author presents thirty five common assumptions people have about faith and practice and counters them with facts and verses from the scripture. Moreover, she encourages readers to take time to read the Bible and lets them decide which to believe.

As a missionary who read the Bible in Greek, among other languages, the author clarifies some passages in the Bible which are commonly interpreted incorrectly because of the translation like the word ‘revealed’ which is mistranslated to ‘created.’ The inaccurate translation gives the verse a different meaning. 

Among the common issues she raises in the book include the original sin, free will and evolution, which are discussed in other Christian books already published. Some issues, however, are more controversial like the reality of hell, the difference between spirit and soul, the virgin mother, cult and occult, Jesus’ marriage and the Abrahamic religion Islam. As if those are not enough, the author raises issues which are subject to (endless) debates including the value of the Old Testament, to judge or not to judge, Jesus being God, and the truth about salvation.

For me, the two most important issues the book raises are: first, why God lets evil things happen to people and second, how to read the Bible and understand the words of God.

This is a great book with very important messages. It is also well written in consistently casual tone making it sound more like a lighthearted fiction instead of a profound and life-changing Christian book. Though everything about the entire book is interesting and enlightening, the parts I like the most are when the author points out that the promise of salvation comes from the assurance of God, through Bible study and prayers, and that it is an individual and personal experience, also, we should read the whole Bible and not just the parts we like. I think a lot of believers can relate to that. Moreover, the author shares stories from her personal experiences which may help readers relate more.

However, other readers may find the author’s some explanations a little bit subjective. Though she backed them up with Bible verses, other readers may have different interpretations and may find her explanations unacceptable. Furthermore, though I personally consider the discussion on Islam enlightening and a courageous act in the part of the author, other readers may find it provocative. Finally, I noticed a few errors in the book including a part when an entire paragraph in page 55 was repeated in page 110.

I, therefore, rate this book 4 out of 4 stars. I find it interesting, informative, encouraging, enlightening and at some points entertaining. I recommend it to both believers and non-believers. For believers, that they may clarify some assumptions they might have heard which might strengthen their faith, and for non-believers, that they may learn some things and reconsider their lack of faith.

******
Immaculate Assumptions 
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One response to “Book Review: Immaculate Assumptions

  1. 5 People read the text and still there were typos. I am so sorry. And I found another one on my own too.

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